Me Before You

Me Before YouMe Before You by Jojo Moyes

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Fans of Jodi Picoult ought to like this one. It’s a love story with a twist, a chance to learn something about quadriplegia, and an exploration of the pros and cons of the right to die. The love story of two very different people learning how to relate to each other I thought was very good. I knew how it was going to end, although I kept hoping it would be different. Partly, I just wasn’t convinced by the choices made. I’m sure it’s a tragedy for anyone to become a quadriplegic, but I just couldn’t agree with Will’s determination to die. Why wasn’t he getting counseling for depression? Why wasn’t he able to work? And he tells Lou at the end that the past six months was the best of his life. It just didn’t add up for me at the end. Will was ultimately controlling and selfish. Lou was a dishrag. She did grow tremendously through prodding from Will, but I didn’t get the sense that she had taken control of her own circumstances afterward. Lots of food for thought. This should make for a great book club discussion. And I will probably read more by this author.

Book Description: Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has barely been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex–Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel—and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is. Will is acerbic, moody, bossy—but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

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Miracle and Other Christmas Stories

Miracle and Other Christmas StoriesMiracle and Other Christmas Stories by Connie Willis

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I will generously give this 3 stars. It was okay, but nothing special. I kind of expected more from Connie Willis. It’s an interesting variety of stories, and even styles, but I think I will be hard-pressed to remember any of them two months from now. My favorite was probably “Adaptation” in which a book-store clerk encounters the ghosts from Dickens’ Christmas Carol. “Inn” was interesting – the plight of Mary and Joseph displaced out of time to the parking lot of a modern-day church. And “Newsletter”, which was a fun spoof of both Christmas newsletters and movies like The Body Snatchers.

Book Description: Connie Willis capture the timeless essence of generosity and goodwill in this magical collection of Christmas stories. These eight tales-two of which have never before been published-boldly reimagine the stories of Christmas while celebrating the power of love and compassion. This enchanting treasury includes:

“Miracle,” in which a young woman’s carefully devised plans to find romance go awry when her guardian angel shows her the true meaning of love
“In Coppelius’s Toyshop,” where a jaded narcissist finds himself trapped in a crowded toy store at Christmastime
“Epiphany,” in which three modern-day wisemen embark on a quest unlike any they’ve ever experienced
“Inn,” where a choir singer gives shelter to a homeless man and his pregnant wife-only to learn later that there’s much more to the couple than meets the eye

The Great Gatsby

The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I read this in high school, but remembered virtually nothing about it except that it was about spoiled, rich people that I couldn’t identify with in any way and didn’t enjoy much. It’s probably over the heads of most high school students. Yes, the prose is lovely, but it’s still about spoiled, rich people that I can’t identify with. But now, at least, I do recognize its literary merit and I’ll give it a solid three stars. I have the feeling that if I were to read this a third or fourth time, that rating would most likely increase. Such is the nature of classics.

I started by listening to the recorded version of this and found it somewhat incomprehensible. I couldn’t follow the story, would lose some detail that informed me who was being spoken about, and felt I was missing too much of the storyline so I got a paperback copy from the library. Reading it, I almost wonder if the audio was abridged (it wasn’t), because there were sections that I did not remember listening to. Usually I love audiobooks, but this one I had to read.

I’ll be interested to watch the various film versions now.

Book description: The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism.